Thinking Through – The Game

game poster

Educational Technologist Dana Atwood-Blaine and I have created a game for the exhibition, Art + Science, at The University of Kansas’ Watson Library and would love it if you would come a play. Using the ARIS platform, players use the books throughout the stack to create a practice-led research question and get all of the research grant money. It is currently in its beta form so there are still a few bugs to work out. Please try it out and help us make it better and more fun.

John Gould’s bird illustrations digitized

gould birdsThanks in part to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, a collection of approximately 6,000 bird illustrations by the 19th century British taxidermist John Gould has been digitized and made available by KU Libraries. Steve Goddard, SMA senior curator of prints & drawings, served as an adviser on the project. Further details about the project are provided in this KU Today story, while the images themselves can be viewed on the KU Luna Collections site. KU Libraries will host an event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 11, at Spencer Research Library to introduce the digitized collection to the public and share information on the creation of the original images as well as their digitization and preservation.

Call for Projects – Hybrid Practices Conference

Rockne Krebs  Sun Cage for "Atlantis", 1973
Rockne Krebs
Sun Cage for “Atlantis”, 1973

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PRACTICE-BASED PROJECTS
Hybrid practices in the arts, sciences, and technology from the 1960s to today

Arts Research Collaboration initiative (ARC)
Spencer Museum of Art
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS, USA
http://www.spencerart.ku.edu

Submission deadline: Nov. 1, 2014

In partnership with the Terra Foundation for American Art, the Spencer Museum of Art (SMA) at the University of Kansas (KU) is organizing a conference on hybrid research practices in the arts, sciences, and technology from the 1960s to today. Distinguished scholars involved in the conference include D. Graham Burnett (Cabinet magazine) and Anne Collins Goodyear (Bowdoin College Museum of Art). Together with papers, roundtables, and keynote presentations, the conference will incorporate performative and event-based creative projects grounded in hybrid art-science-technology research. Selected conference presenters will be invited to a follow-up colloquium, led by David Cateforis (KU) and Shepherd Steiner (Emily Carr University) in May 2015. We anticipate publishing selected papers and projects in an edited volume that serves as both conference proceedings and guide for researchers undertaking work in this field.

To date only a small group of scholars has focused attention on collaborative projects between artists and practitioners in technological and scientific fields during the 1960s and 1970s. Hybrid Practices seeks to broaden our understanding of this pivotal period in U.S. history and in American art by investigating the cultural, political, and social factors that enabled and encouraged such projects to emerge. Although the conference will focus on the United States, we intend to include international perspectives and welcome applications from scholars and practitioners based in other countries. By thoroughly examining early research collaborations among artists, scientists, and technologists, we will establish a context through which to explore the resurgence in hybrid research practices today.

We are seeking proposals for papers and practice-based projects that explore one or more of the following aspects of hybrid artistic research:
1. Key hybrid projects from the past 50 years, including but not limited to Experiments in Art & Technology (Bell Laboratories), Art & Technology (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), and the Artist Placement Group (U.K.)
2. Shared vocabularies among the arts, sciences, and technology, and the role of language in cross-disciplinary collaboration
3. The impact of interdisciplinary work on the identity of the hybrid practitioner

Papers may be organized as case studies or theoretical approaches to the topic. Case studies should focus on one or two projects; they may interrogate the historical moment of the project’s existence, the hybrid methodology involved, and/or the impact of the work as it was assessed both at the time the project took place and in the present. Participants are encouraged to use archival material in these case studies. Theoretical papers may address multiple projects across a broad geographical or historical range. While the conference’s theoretical framework will draw on the work of French philosopher and science historian Michel Serres, participants are not limited to examining his ideas in their papers.

Practice-based projects should explore the same themes as papers while keeping in mind the physical and temporal conference setting. Hybrid Practices will be held at The Commons (www.thecommons.ku.edu), a space dedicated to fostering closer relationships among the sciences, humanities, and arts. It is a fully mediated event space rather than an exhibition space, so practice-based projects should not require sustained display. Applicants are encouraged to submit proposals for projects that could reasonably be produced in this setting. Logistical arrangements for selected projects will be developed in consultation with SMA staff.

SUBMISSION PROCESS

Please submit abstracts of 150–200 words in English, along with a bio of approximately 100 words, to smahybrid@ku.edu. Up to five images may be included to support your proposal.

IMPORTANT DATES

2014

November 1: Deadline for submission of abstracts

November 21: Notification of acceptance

2015

February 9: Deadline for submission of accepted papers

March 10–13: Conference in Lawrence, Kansas

May 29: Follow-up colloquium in Lawrence, Kansas

2016

January: Proceedings published

Red Hot Research No. 15

red hot research logo

4:00 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5

The Commons at Spooner Hall

Back for the fall semester! Several of this week’s presenters collaborate with the Museum on various projects–Paul Atchley is working with ARC on the “Performing History” game app, and Bonnie Johnson was in the galleries last week with her History and Theory of Planning course. Come hear about their research and enjoy good food and drink at the best interdisciplinary networking event on campus.

The full lineup for this week runs as follows:

Ruth Ann Atchley (Psychology); Paul Atchley (Psychology)

Shannon Portillo (Public Affairs & Administration)

Clarence Lang (African and African American Studies, American Studies)

Bonnie Johnson (Urban Planning)

Byron Darby (Design)

Red Hot Research is a series of research sharing sessions that aims to introduce KU researchers to the work of their colleagues, stimulating multidisciplinary inquiry and the formation of new collaborative research teams.  The format of Red Hot Research sessions is inspired by Pecha Kucha.