Tag Archives: Performance

João Fiadeiro, ARC Creative Specialist-in-Residence

ARC’s first Creative Specialist was Portuguese choreographer and researcher João Fiadeiro.  Fiadeiro’s method of “real-time composition” focuses on process rather than product, transforming movement into a theoretical-practical tool and platform to understand and rethink decision, representation, and cooperation, both in art and in life. For the past five years, he has been using this method as a research practice to explore the issues of pre-action, emergency, and decision, thereby broadening its scope to incorporate scientific fields such as anthropology, neurobiology, economics, complex system sciences, and cognitive science. Fiadeiro will do a performance lecture, “The Anatomy of a Decision”, that will explore this method, a transdisciplinary workshop, where faculty are invited to participate in his method and a work-in-progress where he will perform using the real-time composition method in response to the architectural space of The Commons.

“The Anatomy of a Decision”

Performance lecture by João Fiadeiro

Sunday, Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m.

Lied Center Pavilion

“A Transdisciplinary Exploration of Human Systems”

Friday, Feb. 20, 4–8 p.m. & Saturday, Feb. 21, 9–5 p.m.

The Commons

“A Work-in-progress” w/Q&A after the performance.
Friday, Feb. 27, 4:00pm
The Commons

João describing real-time composition.
João describing real-time composition.
Real-time composing
Real-time composing
The Transdisciplinary Workshop at the Commons
The Transdisciplinary Workshop at the Commons
A Real-time composition workshop performance.
A Real-time composition workshop performance.

Performing History

Performing History

We’ve been away from blogging for a while because we have been developing a project called Performing History. The project uses a mobile phone and GPS application (or app) to help guide users across the urban terrain and to interact with it virtually throughout history. This app allows the user to choose an identity/avatar to embody and interact with a historical environment. The platform we intend to use is called ARIS, which was developed by the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The game requires players to have basic cell-phone knowledge, including how to upload a picture, tag an image, or record a video. Users will work their way through the game, utilizing creative problem-solving skills to overcome obstacles in the historical narrative. Sometimes the game will ask them to encounter a historical context as well as respond to it, and have agency in the story. By doing this, users will create possible histories and have more buy-in within the process of engagement with subject. Users will also be able to interact with each other, developing more complex narratives.
The game will deal directly with Lawrence’s rich history, from its origins as an abolitionist town to the early life of Langston Hughes and other prominent African Americans who lived here. Delving into this history will help users to see the time and place they currently live in with new eyes. The game will also make history more engaging for participants, giving them an entryway to further scholarship and a relationship with the past. One of the main goals for the project is to give users what the sociologist Victor Turner called a “liminoid” experience—an experience of personal and social ambiguity, with multiple possible outcomes. Role-play games often provide liminoid experiences for players, giving them an opportunity to consider life through the eyes of others.
Reference Link – http://arisgames.org/